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Karen's 'Beyond Algorithms' in Google's Newsletter for Librarians

Submitted by Teresa Koltzenburg on February 2, 2006 - 7:16pm

If you read FRL (which I know you do), you know how busy Karen is. Considering she's the director of LII.org, I'm always amazed when I see her well-crafted work on FRL and her smiling face and seemingly unhurried composure at conferences (where she's a very sought after individual) at which I've had the pleasure of hanging out with her if only even for a few moments. There's also her work on the ALA Council (representing LITA), and as a lurker on a couple of library-related electronic lists, I know she also finds the time to weigh in on many important issues facing the library field. (And, of course, you know she contributes insightful pieces to this blog, TOO!)

But There's More...
So today, while I was editing copy for the March issue of Smart Libraries Newsletter, in a 'Google Corner(ed)' department piece by Tom Peters, I discovered that Karen contributed, "Beyond Algorithms: A Librarian's Guide to Finding the Web Sites You Can Trust," to one of Google's latest content/Web iterations, its Newsletter for Librarians, which published its second issue on January 19.

"As a librarian who runs a web site catering to people with a hunger for authoritative resources, I'm often asked that question," says Karen in 'Beyond Algorithms.' "As a result, my colleagues and I have developed a five-point system for separating the wheat from the chaff."

You have to sign-up with Google into order to access Google Groups to subscribe to the newsletter, but this was a short-and-sweet process, and well worth the access.

'Beyond Algorithms' provides a handy little system to help librarians (and content producers and editors... well, probably just about everybody whose business is content) to sort through—and ultimately point users to—trustworthy portals in the mishmash of content on the Web. (Luckily, though, we have Librarians' Index to the Internet to help us all with this never-ending task.)