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Posts by Tom Peters

That Old Time Gestalt Experience

Submitted by Tom Peters on March 9, 2006 - 12:15pm

Tom Peters (not David Pogue)In today's online New York Times (no-cost subscription required), David Pogue has an interesting article ('Almost iPod, but in the End a Samsung') about the Samsung Z5 MP3 player as a pretender to the throne currently occupied by the iPod Nano.

If you're having a hard time imagining how a newspaper article about such a tight, techie topic could be interesting, let me tell you that I think this article really is about the gestalt experience of using any personal, portable infotainment / communication appliance, be it an MP3 player, cell phone, PDA, tablet PC, or anything else you can imagine. Read More »


The Monster Mashup

Submitted by Tom Peters on March 6, 2006 - 1:45pm

Tom Peters Head Shot

Lately, I've been wondering if the mashup will become one of the defining characteristics of information technology during this decade. Will we remember this era as much for the mashups as for the mass-digitization crashups? Mashups may rule, while snippets drool.

According to the Wikipedia (visited on March 4, 2006), a mashup in this sense is “…a website or web application that seamlessly combines content from more than one source into an integrated experience." For example, if you're into downhill skiing, visit Ski Bonk for the latest integrated info, which mashes up ski resort reports, weather data, maps, and other data to create its service. Read More »

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Plogging Toward Completion

Submitted by Tom Peters on February 7, 2006 - 11:39pm

Max the DogEarly this morning, my dog Max and I should have been out jogging—in pursuit of our mutual general project goals to lose weight and to improve our cardiovascular systems. Instead, we were plodding along at our customary meditative pace beneath the belt of Orion. Undoubtedly, Max was contemplating the tasty morsels that the toddlers would toss to him from their highchairs later today. I was pondering plogging.
Read More »

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iTunes U Tackles Whatsamatta U

Submitted by Tom Peters on January 26, 2006 - 4:00pm

Bullwinkle the Moose (TM)Recently Apple, Inc., announced that it will allow colleges and universities to use a special sector within the overall iTunes service to load and distribute course lectures, other course content, and related digital audio and video files. The Cupertino, California-based company calls its new service " iTunes U."
Read More »


Glocal Yokels

Submitted by Tom Peters on January 19, 2006 - 6:53am

Glocal logoYears ago, the rallying cry, "Think globally, act locally," gained a certain popularity. It encouraged us all to consider the global, long-term consequences of our everyday actions, so we could then concentrate on making personal decisions and actions that were as socially, culturally, and environmentally responsible as possible.

The phrase then got boiled down to a single word—"glocal"— which, for some reason, always makes me think of the old phrase "local yokel" meaning a dull and gullible country bumpkin or clodhopper.
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I Owe My Soul to the Company Store

Submitted by Tom Peters on January 6, 2006 - 1:11pm

Tom Peters Head Shot Like a puny but feisty kid trying to grow up and gain respect in a blue-collar town, portable electronic devices designed primarily for reading digital-textual documents, such as ebooks, are about to re-enter the general U.S. consumer electronic fray.

When dedicated reading devices hit the U.S. market in the late 90s, they were soundly drubbed, or worse, laughed at and ignored. Will 2006 be just a re-match with the same, predictable result?
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Mulled Whine

Submitted by Tom Peters on December 28, 2005 - 4:34pm

Max the Dog Wakes Up in Blue SpringsFor the last few mornings during my pre-dawn walkabout with our dog Max I have been mulling over the Library 2.0 thing, especially the overview that Michael Stephens posted on this blog in November.

Some of the ideas jostling under the Library 2.0 rubric I have never even considered, which is great. Others are ideas I have been mulling over and whining about—primarily internally as a private whine—for years.
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NOT Coming Soon to a Theater Near You

Submitted by Tom Peters on December 12, 2005 - 11:03am

movie cameraThroughout nearly all of the twentieth century, large companies controlled the creation, dissemination, and viewing of video information. Motion pictures started first, with television added as another layer in mid-century. Video really was a carefully controlled broadcast medium. The phrase, “Coming Soon to a Theater Near You!" captures in a nutshell how public anticipation for a new release of a movie was carefully orchestrated. Time-shifting, place-shifting, and format-shifting generally were not encouraged.

Early in the development of the motion picture industry the companies controlled the production, distribution, and screening of their products—until the U.S. federal government broke up those vertical monopolies. Read More »


Sinners in the Hands of an Angry Search Engine

Submitted by Tom Peters on December 5, 2005 - 12:15am

Jonathan Edwards Google's Book Search Library Project, the massive digitization project involving the “G5 libraries" (Michigan, Stanford, Oxford, the New York Public Library, and Harvard), has really touched a cultural nerve.

Quite a few discussants have concentrated on the details of one or more facets of this project, i.e., fair use, the lawsuits, the digitization process and technology involved, Google’s business interests, and the G5 libraries’ motives and anticipated benefits.

There also seem to be some deeper, inchoate fears lurking about...

Read More »

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2006: The Year of the ...

Submitted by Tom Peters on November 28, 2005 - 10:32am

December is almost here, which means that the calendar year as we know it is drawing to a close. This will unleash the urge—and the annual ritual of the popular press—to write reflective articles about the year just finishing and predictive articles about 2006. The top events in politics, the arts, athletics, and other areas will be rehashed and ranked. I predict that natural disasters will receive a lot more attention and ink than they have in the retrospectives of previous years.

Rather than look back on 2005, let's look forward to 2006. To get a jump on the competition, I'm going to stick my neck out and speculate a bit about what could be major developments in library and information technology in the coming year. I have two things in mind: Both technologies have been around for awhile, but 2006 could be the breakout year for both.
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